Event details

March 4, 2021
2:00 PM

Circuses were a popular form of entertainment in Nazi Germany and across Europe in the decades leading up to World War II. Jewish circus artists helped shape the industry in the late 19th century, and some—including a Jewish acrobat named Irene Danner—were saved by circuses during the Holocaust.

Join the Museum for a program exploring the lives and legacies of Jewish circus artists between 1860 and 1945 with Stav Meishar, a multidisciplinary performance maker, stage artist, academic researcher, and educator who has created and performed The Escape Act, a one-woman show based on Danner’s story which also incorporates her personal experiences as the granddaughter of Holocaust survivors; and Dr. Marline Otte, Associate Professor of History at Tulane University and author of Jewish Identities in German Popular Entertainment, 1890–1933.

A $10 suggested donation enables us to present programs like this one. We thank you for your support.

We would like to express our appreciation to the Conference on Jewish Material Claims Against Germany (Claims Conference) for supporting this public program. Through recovering the assets of the victims of the Holocaust, the Claims Conference enables organizations around the world to provide education about the Shoah and to preserve the memory of those who perished.

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Public programming at the Museum of Jewish Heritage – A Living Memorial to the Holocaust is made possible, in part, by public funds from the New York City Department of Cultural Affairs, in partnership with the City Council; the New York State Council on the Arts with the support of Governor Andrew M. Cuomo and the New York State Legislature; a Humanities New York CARES Grant with support from the National Endowment for the Humanities and the federal CARES Act; and other generous donors.

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