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(New York, NY) – The following is a statement from the Museum of Jewish Heritage – A Living Memorial to the Holocaust in response to the racially motivated murders in Georgia this week.

“The Museum of Jewish Heritage – A Living Memorial to the Holocaust condemns the racially motivated murders of eight women on March 16, 2021 and the 3,800 incidents of hate targeting the Asian American Pacific Islander community in the past year. The alarming rise in anti-Asian violence, as well as antisemitism, are symptoms of the record-setting increase of white supremacist extremism that must be met with resistance and education. We stand with our elected leaders, sister organizations, and fellow community members across the country to combat the rising tide of racial discrimination and violence against the Asian American Pacific Islander community.”

About the Museum of Jewish Heritage – A Living Memorial to the Holocaust
The Museum of Jewish Heritage – A Living Memorial to the Holocaust is New York’s contribution to the global responsibility to never forget. The Museum is committed to the crucial mission of educating diverse visitors about Jewish life before, during, and after the Holocaust. The third largest Holocaust museum in the world and the second largest in North America, the Museum of Jewish Heritage anchors the southernmost tip of Manhattan, completing the cultural and educational landscape it shares with the Statue of Liberty and Ellis Island.

The Museum of Jewish Heritage maintains a collection of almost 40,000 artifacts, photographs, documentary films, and survivor testimonies and contains classrooms, a 375-seat theater (Edmond J. Safra Hall), special exhibition galleries, a resource center for educators, and a memorial art installation, Garden of Stones, designed by internationally acclaimed sculptor Andy Goldsworthy. The Museum is the home of National Yiddish Theatre Folksbiene.

Currently on view is the acclaimed exhibition Auschwitz. Not long ago. Not far away. This is the most comprehensive exhibition dedicated to the history of Auschwitz and its role in the Holocaust ever presented in North America, bringing together more than 700 original objects and 400 photographs from over 20 institutions and museums around the world. In response to demand, the exhibition’s run concludes May 2, 2021.

Also on view are Ordinary Treasures: Highlights from the Museum of Jewish Heritage Collection and Rendering Witness: Holocaust-Era Art as Testimony.

The Museum receives general operating support from the New York City Department of Cultural Affairs and New York State Council on the Arts.